Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jacob deGrom - Gets His Contract Extension

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jacob deGrom - Gets His Contract Extension

    Some great news after a bizarre week. Five years $137.5MM which would take him through 2024, his age-36 season. That sure feels like a great deal for both parties given his age and the recent spate of $30MM+ per year contracts for stars.

  • #2
    I've read differently. I've read it includes this year, so it takes him through his age 35 season. Essentially it was a 4 year extension at 120.5M on top of the 17M he was slated to already make this year (or 30M per year).

    Also has an opt out after 2022 and a team option for 32.5 in 2024.

    The breakdown, per the New York Post's Joel Sherman, is as follows:

    $10 millilon signing bonus
    $7 million in 2019
    $23 million in 2020
    $33.5 million in 2021 and 2022
    $30.5 million in 2023
    $32.5 million club option 2024

    https://www.sny.tv/mets/news/photos-...ming/305643730

    Comment


    • #3
      I think it's a great deal for both side. Minimum, 3 year extension. Gives the highest value after Cespedes off the books. DeGrom gets to opt out at age 34 if he thinks he can squeeze out one more contract. If he stays, and performs, gives the Mets the chance to extend him 1 year without much risk.

      And we, the fans, get to keep our Ace!

      Wins all around.

      Comment


      • #4
        Mets Agree to Extension with Jacob deGrom


        by JEFF TODD
        26 Mar 2019 at 7:36 AM CDT

        The Mets have agreed to terms on an extension with star right-hander Jacob deGrom, according to Andy Martino of SNY.tv (Twitter links). deGrom, the reigning National League Cy Young Award winner, is undergoing a physical today. The contract includes four years and $120.5MM in new money, as Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic first reported (Twitter links), with some of it deferred.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	deGrom.Jacob-vertical-768x889.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	142.7 KB
ID:	5953Earlier this year, deGrom agreed to a $17MM arbitration contract for the 2019 season. That effectively remains in place, though it is now restructured as a $10MM signing bonus and $7MM salary, Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports on Twitter. What would have been deGrom’s final arbitration season, 2020, will be locked in at $23MM. He’ll then earn $33.5MM in each of the next two seasons and $30.5MM in 2023 — if he does not first opt out. The option-year value is $32.5MM, ESPN.com’s Jeff Passan tweets.

        If indeed a deal is finalized, it’d bring an end to a long-running and rather fascinating saga regarding deGrom’s future. It was just last summer that deGrom’s then-agent, Brodie Van Wagenen, was advocating that the team either work out an extension or trade the ace right-hander. In a cinematic twist, Van Wagenen became the Mets’ general manager last fall, recusing himself from direct extension talks with deGrom while the pitcher chose to remain with the same agency (CAA Baseball). (That recusal concept was evidently of rather limited scope, or has since been modified or waived, as Sherman tweets that Van Wagenen was personally on hand for the final negotiations.)
        The sides held preliminary talks at the Winter Meetings, but then a lengthy silent period ensued. After agreeing to a 2019 arbitration salary, which included a record-setting $9.6MM raise, the deGrom camp put an Opening Day deadline on talks, so the clock was ticking. It seemed hopeful as camp opened that a deal would materialize, but the more recent vibe was much less promising.

        As it turns out, the sides lined up on a contract that understandably includes some concessions in both directions. deGrom will turn 31 this June and was not set to reach the open market until the conclusion of the 2020 campaign. Compare that to Chris Sale, whose recent extension came just before his 30th birthday and entering his final season of contractual control. (Of course, the lefty was also coming off of an injury-limited second half to the 2018 season.) Sale’s contract provided five seasons and $145MM in new earnings; he’ll pitch the entire final season of that deal at 35 years of age. deGrom receives a slightly higher AAV, even though the first new contract year covers an arb-eligible season, and will celebrate his 35th birthday in the middle of his final guaranteed season (if he hasn’t already opted out).

        Both of those outstanding hurlers might have found greater riches in free agency. Zack Greinke had already turned 32 when he secured a six-year, $206.5MM deal with the Diamondbacks. But that deal seemed an outlier when it was signed and the market has since shifted. Clayton Kershaw hadn’t yet turned 31 and had produced nothing but excellent results when he re-upped with the Dodgers last fall, but settled for a three-year pact after experiencing back issues and peripheral declines.

        There’s also ample risk in pitching a full MLB season, so extensions have generally lagged free agency in value to a greater extent than is the case for position players. A few still-youthful hurlers nearing free agency have secured bigger money — Kershaw didn’t quite reach $200MM in his first long-term contract if you deduct his anticipated arbitration salary from that season; Stephen Strasburg secured $175MM over seven new seasons part-way through his final year of team control. But otherwise, the largest pitching extensions have gone to Sale ($145MM), Cole Hamels ($144.5MM), and Justin Verlander ($140MM).

        For their money, the Mets will secure the services of one of the game’s very best hurlers for most or all of his remaining productive campaigns. Never overly hyped as a prospect, deGrom’s early development was slowed by Tommy John surgery. But he emerged in 2014, earning a call-up to the majors and succeeding beyond any reasonable expectations. While he was never much of a strikeout pitcher in the minors, deGrom steadily maintained about a K per inning in his early seasons. He began ramping that up further in 2017, which was also his first 200-plus-inning campaign, but didn’t really take the next step until last year.

        Entering the 2018 campaign, deGrom carried a 2.98 ERA with 9.7 K/9 and 2.3 BB/9 through 680 2/3 career innings. There had been a few health wobbles along the way but he was, by and large, a durable and thoroughly excellent pitcher. It seemed there wasn’t much more ceiling to reach, but he unquestionably found it.

        Ramping up his velocity (96.7 mph average fastball) and increasingly shelving his sinker in favor of his two offspeed offerings (change and slider; combined usage of 40%) helped deGrom boost his swinging-strike rate to a career-high 15.1%. He drove his strikeout rate up to a personal-best 11.2 K/9 while maintaining a typically sparkling 1.9 BB/9 walk rate, cut back on the home run issues that had cropped up a bit in 2017, and induced nearly as much soft contact (25.2%) as he allowed hard contact (26.6%).

        The results followed those impressive underlying numbers. deGrom finished the 2018 campaign with 217 innings of 1.70 ERA ball. Unsurprisingly, given the off-the-charts earned run outcomes, ERA estimators felt there was a bit of good fortune mixed in — but not enough to detract from deGrom’s excellence. He was credited with 1.99 FIP, 2.60 xFIP, and 2.78 SIERA.

        Nothing is assured in this world, least of all when it comes to future pitching performance. But deGrom seems about as good a bet as any veteran hurler to keep producing into his mid-thirties. His ability to maintain top physical form will perhaps dictate the extent to which he can approach his newly established personal heights, but his multi-pitch arsenal and impeccable command seem to provide about as much of a floor as any starter.

        The upside in the contract is plainly limited by deGrom’s age, but that doesn’t mean the Mets can’t hope to achieve good value. The organization will still retain a fair bit of payroll flexibility after the 2020 season, the final year of obligations to Yoenis Cespedes and a few other pricey veterans. deGrom knocks Cespedes off of the organization’s financial Mt. Rushmore, joining David Wright, Johan Santana, Carlos Beltran to make up the four largest contracts in Mets history.

        Photo courtesy of USA Today Sports Images.

        Drew's Sig

        Comment


        • #5
          BVW delivered. deG, former client of BVW and still engaged with the same agency got the big payday. Mets bought out the last two seasons of control and deG signed for an additional 3 seasons with an opt out and a 32M team option at age 36. Hurray?

          Payrolls are not necessarily finite, but they do have extremes. Every dollar committed is one less dollar available under the teams finite threshold. deG received a 10 M bump from 7M to 17M after a historically significant season...repeatable... not a chance.

          deG is now scheduled to receive 25M for 2020 which would have been his walk year. deG would have to have another outstanding season to have won an 8M bump in arbitration. Which brings us to the 3 year extension which covers age 33 -35 at 103.5 M or an AAV of 34.5M per.

          That is a huge commitment based upon one season. One year ago deG was coming off a season with an ERA of 3.53 -1.19 and 201 IP, all in all a very good season with CYA votes placing him 8th and a 3.4M increase in arbitration.

          The Mets have bet the farm that the 2018 deG is the real thing and not an outlier...hope they're right.

          Comment


          • #6
            Long-term pitcher contracts are always risky, but this is something they had to do to show a commitment to a home-grown elite pitcher. If you're going to commit to winning during this window where a top pitching staff is backed by some serious up-and-coming talent in the field you have to sign the leader of that charge.

            FANG is correct, it's through his age-35 year which is even better timing for the team. They save this year and next and then pay at the end but it doesn't matter where the money actually lands, you're paying for his performance over the next 3-4 years and hoping he stays healthy and maintains ace performance levels.

            Plus this removes the distraction during the season, takes away the noise from Syndergaard about showing commitment to players, and sends a message that the team isn't afraid to pay for it's top talent. It's also a nice shot in the arm before the season starts, and that momentum could carry over. Less uncertainty and more bedrock to build a winner.

            You're right Yogi, last year was an outlier but it would be an outlier for anyone. Heck, even Bob Gibson's legendary year was an outlier compared to the rest of his career but any team would sign up to have him in their rotation for his entire time on the mound. deGrom has been pretty consistent since moving up full-time and at least there's a pretty decent sample from which to extrapolate.

            Comment


            • #7
              Gosh Yogi - I feel like you hate all big contracts.

              I can't see this as anything but a win. They were in for the 17. Short of TJ (god forbid) they'd have been in for the 23 next. So really it's a bet that he stay healthy, and gave him 3 years 96M extension with a club option for a 4th at 32M. How is that anything but a win? It's not 7-8 years. It's not 35M a year.

              Scherzer at age 30 got 7 years 30M per (and worth every penny so far). Prior to that a 5th place CY award and 1st place CYA and a bunch of mediocre years (3.58 ERA with Tigers which includes the 2 good years)
              DeGrom at the same age is a ROY Winner. CY-7, CY-8, CY-1 2.67 career ERA who got 5 years 137. (votes in 3 of the 5 years, no love rookie year due to innings of 140). Take out the "outlier" and you still have 4 years 2.98 ERA. You don't take that to headline your staff?

              What is there to dislike about this move?
              Last edited by NY FANG; 26-Mar-2019, 07:35 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by NY FANG View Post
                Gosh Yogi - I feel like you hate all big contracts.

                I can't see this as anything but a win. They were in for the 17. Short of TJ (god forbid) they'd have been in for the 23 next. So really it's a bet that he stay healthy, and gave him 3 years 96M extension with a club option for a 4th at 32M. How is that anything but a win? It's not 7-8 years. It's not 35M a year.

                Scherzer at age 30 got 7 years 30M per (and worth every penny so far). Prior to that a 5th place CY award and 1st place CYA and a bunch of mediocre years (3.58 ERA with Tigers which includes the 2 good years)
                DeGrom at the same age is a ROY Winner. CY-7, CY-8, CY-1 2.67 career ERA who got 5 years 137. (votes in 3 of the 5 years, no love rookie year due to innings of 140). Take out the "outlier" and you still have 4 years 2.98 ERA. You don't take that to headline your staff?

                What is there to dislike about this move?
                I hate all contracts too, but you need them if you plan to stay competitive with the other 29 teams.

                Comment


                • #9
                  you have to pick wisely.

                  People clamoring to give DeGrom a deal 2 years ago, or Thor last year, or Harvey when he was still the Dark Knight, or Mesoraco when he had the hot July... those are the silly ones.

                  (I know Yogi is going to hate this one) but it's the reason I didn't hate the Cespedes deal. It was more money than he was worth AAV, but it was only 4 years, so it mitigated the risk and removed the paying for the downhill 35+ seasons.

                  Same with deGrom. When you have an ace, and you can lock him up on a 3 year extension... that's about as minimal risk as you can get. No 35+ seasons (buyers option), no long term. It's a nice little deal for all sides.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I’m told Van Wagenen and his former partner at CAA Sports, Jeff Berry, had the framework of the deGrom deal for a couple of weeks but could not get the Wilpons to sign off on it.
                    There is no doubt Fred and Jeff Wilpon had to think long and hard about doling out another long-term monster contract to one of their star players – and no doubt they had to gulp hard before finally agreeing to pay Jacob deGrom $137.5 million for the next five years, at the conclusion of which he will be turning 36 years old.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      the thing with it being "risky" to shell out a lengthy extension, is that they have gotten 900 innings of 2.67 ERA, 1.072 WHIP out of him in the past 5 seasons, while paying him "peanuts" in MLB dollars...

                      2014: league minimum
                      2015: $567K;
                      2016: $607K;
                      2017: $4 Mil;
                      2018: $7.4 Mil;

                      To put it in context, they are paying a chump like Jason Vargas $22 Mil over 3 seasons...vs under $13 Mil for 5 seasons of deGrom pitching like an Ace...

                      Even if he falters at some point, the Mets have made money off of deGrom

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The article that Sax posted above is a very interesting read. Lists a multitude of big contracts that the Mets got burned on. Nice find Sax.

                        Glad BVW was able to get them to take the plunge.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Very few teams have consistently won without committing to some big contracts for stars. Yes there are occasional exceptions but you have to pay to get results. deGrom is a homegrown player, a good clubhouse guy, a bulldog competitor and a pitcher coming off an historic year in the prime of his career.

                          Could it go wrong? Sure, sports is full of randomness which is why it's compelling. You have to make good, measured choices though to reduce that randomness.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here's the problem. Looking at the teams that have maintained a multi year successful period over past 20 years. You really have 3 choices when it comes to how to build a team.
                            1. Spend Spend Spend. The Yankees, RedSox, Dodgers method. Make a mistake? Don't worry, spend to replace that mistake. Spending has it's perks... it only costs money, so you get to keep your prospects
                            2. Suck for a long time. I don't mean be mediocre and miss the playoffs. I mean truly suck. This way you get a stable of high draft picks. And you keep them, and develop them, and hope many work out. Then, and only then do you spend in the FA market, and even then, marginally and responsibly. This comes at a cost of having a fan base angry at you during those periods of suckitude, no way around it.
                            3. Walk the middle and stay in the middle. Trade prospects for players who will help in the short term, or who have a field value about their salary. Means you're constantly filling holes from the middle of the FA pack raising your payroll without actually getting a difference maker.

                            Mets consistently go with option three. Because of it, their farm is consistently depleted when they need it. As such, they max out their resources on guys like Todd Frazier, Jed Lowrie, Jay Bruce, Astrubal Cabrera, Jason Vargas, who are great recent examples of throwing money into the mediocrity pit because they didn't have depth of their own.

                            But if you're not willing to go the suck til your awesome route... and you're not willing to spend spend spend, then for the most part, you're going to have a pretty hard time finding success in this league.

                            I disagree on the Beltran contract burning them, 4.5 star years out of 6.5 and Zach Wheeler. How was this a burn? The rest, fine, shit happens, pick better.

                            This extension, IMO, should have been a no brainer. An additional commitment of only 4 years is as reasonable as you're going to get in baseball (see slew of other stars on 8-12 year deals). Truly, if you are not comfortable with the human risk aspects of owning a sports franchise... then there are options... but not ever signing star players truly should not be one of them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              so it mitigated the risk and removed the paying for the downhill 35+ seasons.

                              The larger the contract the larger the risk and that risk when it strikes is the crippling anchor that takes the team down. Johan was done at age 31, Cespedes at 31 has missed 205 of the last 324 games...numbers that continue to climb. DW was 32 when his injury ended his career. Research would add additional names; Ellsbury and Prince Fielder....?

                              I understand that the Mets hands were tied...deG had to be paid, but the money is insane and that insanity puts the teams future at risk with no guarantee of success. Big spending's record is a poor one.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X