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2019 MLB Rules - The Propose Changes

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  • 2019 MLB Rules - The Propose Changes

    MLB and Players Discussing Rule Changes That Could Alter Game


    by JEFF PASSAN

    Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association are discussing potentially drastic changes to the on-field game and economic landscape of the sport in the middle of a collective bargaining agreement, a significant departure from the past that speaks to the chasm between the parties but represents a thaw in the chill that has divided the sides, sources familiar with the talks told ESPN.

    Dueling proposals from MLB on Jan. 14 and the union on Friday covered a wide range of topics, according to sources. Among them include:
    • A three-batter minimum for pitchers
    • A universal designated hitter
    • A single trade deadline before the All-Star break
    • A 20-second pitch clock
    • The expansion of rosters to 26 men, with a 12-pitcher maximum
    • Draft advantages for winning teams and penalties for losing teams
    • A study to lower the mound
    • A rule that would allow two-sport amateurs to sign major league contracts

    With owners meetings set to begin this week and spring training next week amid another tepid free-agent market, the willingness to bandy about ideas -- and the openness to addressing concerns -- is seen as a step in the right direction by both sides. Whether any substantive change comes of it, sources said, remains unclear.

    The three-batter minimum for pitchers, first reported by The Athletic, is perhaps the most controversial measure, as it would ostensibly eliminate a job created by modern bullpen use: the one-out left-handed reliever. MLB's proposal of the idea illustrates the league's concern with both time and pace of game, as constant bullpen shuffling has contributed to the average game time lasting longer than three hours. The rule would apply to all pitchers, except in instances in which pitchers finish an inning or are injured, sources said.

    The union did not strongly oppose the idea, according to sources, instead suggesting it preferred the implementation to be delayed until 2020 rather than 2019, as MLB proposed.

    The league's other bid to deal with pace of play was the enactment of a 20-second pitch clock, something commissioner Rob Manfred can put into place unilaterally. While numerous players have spoken out against the pitch clock, the recognition that Manfred has the ability to mandate it, even without the union's support, gives him leverage on the issue, according to sources.

    In the discussions, the possibility of the clock being turned off when runners are on base was raised, sources said.

    One of the union's counter proposals was the adoption of the designated hitter in the National League, according to sources. While a compromise could be the rule being eased in, the union is advocating for a universal DH in 2019, sources said.

    In addition to the universal DH, the MLBPA is interested in changes that would use draft picks to incentivize winning and grant players the ability to earn additional service, which could allow them to hit free agency earlier and theoretically counteract what the union believes is the manipulation of service time by teams.

    Low-revenue teams that succeed -- whether by finishing above .500 or making the playoffs -- would be given greater draft positions or bonus pools under the union's proposal, according to sources. While the depth of the penalties were not clear, the union suggested teams that lose 90-plus games in consecutive years could be affected negatively in the draft.

    In the wake of Oakland Athletics first-round pick Kyler Murray potentially leaving behind baseball to pursue an NFL career after a Heisman Trophy-winning season, the union also suggested the idea of bringing back the major league contract as an enticement for two-sport athletes to stick with baseball, sources said. Currently, all draft contracts are minor league deals subject to a draft pool that penalizes teams that exceed it.

    Service-time issues remain a key concern for the union, according to sources, with teams capable of keeping major league-ready players in the minor leagues without recourse. While both sides acknowledge service time is a difficult problem to solve, the union's proposal included the possibility of additional service time for performance, playoff appearances or awards, according to sources.

    Among the union's ideas was a single trade deadline before the All-Star break, sources said. Currently, the non-waiver trade deadline is July 31, and players who pass through waivers can be dealt until Aug. 31. An earlier trade deadline could force teams to emphasize the first half, which might force them to focus more in the offseason on acquiring players via free agency to improve the likelihood of that rather than allowing them to strike well past the 100-game mark.

    MLB's carrot in its proposal was an expansion of roster size from 25 to 26, creating 30 new major league jobs, according to sources. The offering included a 28-man limit on September rosters and a maximum of 12 pitchers during non-September games, sources said.

    The league also is interested in studying mound height, with the potential for Manfred to implement a lowering of the mound in 2020, according to sources.

    Another league proposal would end all spring training games that are tied after 10 innings and use spring training and the All-Star Game as testing grounds for the rule that starts a runner on second base in the 10th inning of a tied game.

    In typical bargaining sessions, dozens of ideas are offered, considered and placed on the back burner, so the likelihood of a handful of these proposals being ratified, let alone all of them, is unlikely, according to sources. Still, as MLB and the union seek to find a place of understanding amid a winter chill that has fractured already-tenuous relations, the mere discussion, sources said, is considered a positive.

    Drew's Sig

  • #2
    I like most of them. Don't like the DH, but the AL will never go back and I'm tired of the AL having an advantage when AL/NL teams meet.

    Have no idea about this one . . . .

    A rule that would allow two-sport amateurs to sign major league contracts

    . . as I don't what it is now.
    Drew's Sig

    Comment


    • #3
      MLB, Union Discussing Significant Rule Changes


      by STEVE ADAMS and JEFF TODD
      6 Feb 2019 at 7:53 AM CDT

      Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred and MLBPA executive director Tony Clark have recently been discussing a series of potential rule changes centering around pace of play, roster size and roster construction, writes Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic (subscription link). ESPN.com’s Jeff Passan and Joel Sherman of the New York Post (Twitter thread) add further details, characterizing the dialogue as something of a thaw in relations.

      The two most notable changes that’ll jump out to readers are surely the Union’s proposal for a universal designated hitter — possibly beginning as soon as the 2019 season — and the league’s proposal that all pitchers must face a minimum of three hitters per appearance (barring an injury). Other especially notable concepts under discussion include expanding standard rosters to 26 players and shrinking September rosters to 28 players. Both were proposed by the league with an eye toward the 2020 season.

      Obviously, the mere fact that the two sides are discussing various scenarios is far from an indication that a significant number of the ideas being bandied about will come to fruition. However, the game has generally had at least a handful of new rules implemented in each recent season, with restrictions on the number of mound visits per game and automatic intentional walks among the most recent alterations that have come into play.

      The addition of a designated hitter in the National League for the 2019 season would not only lead to a great deal of pushback from many fans — though that’s true of all rule changes — but could lead to some unrest among both teams and agents. Perhaps all parties were quietly made aware of this possibility back in November, but if not, there’d undoubtedly be an advantage for teams that held off on activity early in the winter. Conversely, a player such as Nelson Cruz would be understandably irked to only now be learning that his market might’ve included 15 other teams.

      It’s not a surprise that the MLBPA would want to push for a designated hitter in the NL with this level of immediacy, though. There would be clear ramifications on the player market, which could help a few more players find jobs late in the winter. Names like Evan Gattis, Lucas Duda, Adam Jones, Carlos Gonzalez and others could all find increased interest, and the added lineup depth in the NL would likely have some degree of impact on the markets for the game’s top two free agents: Bryce Harper and Manny Machado. Perhaps this wouldn’t lead to entirely new suitors emerging, but the prospect of having the increased flexibility of a DH could make it easier for Harper to fit onto a team with a crowded outfield mix or for Machado to fit onto a roster with a perceived infield logjam. And the long-term outlook for any premium hitter would change with the ability to utilize a DH slot.

      All of that said, though, it still seems likelier that a rule change that impacts the very manner in which a team constructs its roster is something that would need to be known to all months in advance. The Union may be proposing implementation of the rule in 2019, but it seems more plausible that it’d come into effect in 2020 at the earliest.

      Those factors have led to doubt in some quarters that the DH will indeed come to the NL this year, as Andy Martino of SNY.tv reports (Twitter links). Even if the commissioner’s office decides it would like to move ahead, Martino cautions, the owners may well be slower to come around. And even if they are open to a quick turnaround, the expectation is that there’ll be an expectation of concessions on the part of the union. Whether the players will be amenable to giving value back for the DH — a rule change that would hold out at least some promise for enlarging the overall pie by bringing more offense to the National league — remains to be seen.

      Turning to the three-batter minimum, that would all but wipe out the so-called “LOOGY” role — the left-handed relief specialists who are oft called upon to face just one or two lefties before being swapped out. That minimum could also come into play for teams that have been most aggressive in utilizing the “opener” role; the days of Dan Jennings and his southpaw peers facing just one batter to start a game before departing (a tactic the Brewers did indeed use this season) would be instantly wiped out. Per Passan, this proposed change came from the league side; the players “did not strongly oppose the idea” but suggested waiting to deploy it until the 2020 season.

      Left-handed relievers and their representatives surely wouldn’t be thrilled with the development, though it seems likely to reduce the number of pitching changes and conversely place a greater deal of emphasis on rostering and developing relievers who can throw one or more innings without glaring platoon splits. Players who fit that mold, naturally, would see the demand for their services rise even further. Perhaps the union imagines that there could be some other market advantages to a general de-specialization of relief roles, as there’d be slightly greater incentive to keep starters in for longer and a slight enhancement of the market value of the best overall relief arms.

      Rosenthal notes that eliminating specialist roles could lead to fewer strikeouts by virtue of the fact that there’d be an increase of plate appearances in which batters held the platoon advantage, though it seems that such a reduction would be relatively minimal. While specialist relievers admittedly have higher strikeout rates against same-handed opponents, the general league-wide discrepancy in strikeout rate in platoon situations isn’t as staggering as some might think; right-handed hitters (excluding pitchers hitting in NL parks) struck out at a 22.3 percent clip against fellow righties and a 21.1 percent clip against lefties. Meanwhile, left-handed hitters fanned at a 23.5 percent rate against southpaw pitchers and a 20.9 percent rate against righties. There would be some impact, to be sure, but it’s unlikely that this change alone would curb stand in the way of yet another record-setting strikeout mark in 2019.

      Ultimately, the batters-faced minimum and the theoretical slight downturn in strikeouts further gets into what has become the focal point of Manfred’s tenure as commissioner: improving the game’s pace of play. That, as Manfred has noted on multiple occasions, includes both length of game and the level of action within a game (more specifically, the number of balls put into play). Reducing the number of pitching changes and even incrementally increasing the number of balls in play could lead to small gains in both of those goals, though neither seems likely to bring about major change, and the advent of the “opener” strategy may even mitigate whatever pitching changes are eliminated by implementing a minimum number of batters faced.

      To that end, there figure to be further tweaks to the game, be they in 2019, 2020 or beyond. Rosenthal reminds that Manfred does have the power to unilaterally implement the 20-second pitch clock that was proposed last offseason, even if no agreement is reached with the players’ union. Beyond that, there’s also been discussion of even further reducing the maximum number of mound visits a team can make, and the league apparently has interest in using Spring Training to experiment with runners being placed on the bases in extra innings.

      Most of the foregoing has little to do with what is surely the union’s greater concern — the increasingly glacial pace of the MLB offseason and the rampant increase of teams tanking in order to increase their access to amateur talent in the league’s hard-slotted draft and international markets. Perhaps some concessions could be made to help appease both sides, though it still seems that an extraordinarily contentious set of negotiations is on the horizon when the current collective bargaining agreement expires in 2021.

      It does seem there are some relatively minor initiatives being pursued by the players on that front, with Passan adding a few items of note. In particular, the MLBPA has proposed the implementation of a single trade deadline to take place before the All-Star break, rather than the current system of a non-waiver deadline at the end of July and what is effectively an end-of-August deadline to acquire players that have cleared waivers. Eliminating later-season trade opportunities, the union seemingly believes, would force teams to be more proactive in their offseason investments. Likewise, Passan says, the union has proposed various concepts (still mostly vague in their details) involving gains or losses of draft picks and international amateur spending availability to incentivize greater spending by all clubs.

      Finally, in another area that impacts overall player earning capacity in a complicated manner, the players have floated some ideas regarding service-time manipulation of top prospects. According to Passan, the concept seems to be that players could boost their service time through “performance, playoff appearances or awards.” Finding a workable arrangement will surely be quite complicated, but that is at least a creative approach to what seems from the outside to be rather a vexing problem to solve given the inherently subjective considerations involved in promoting a player.

      Taken as a whole, there is obviously quite a lot to digest and for the parties still to discuss. We’ll see whether any significant changes are implemented in advance of the present season — and whether they can be settled in time to influence the final outcomes of this winter’s market.

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      • #4
        Among them include:
        • A three-batter minimum for pitchers
        agreed;

        • A universal designated hitter
        agreed;

        • A single trade deadline before the All-Star break
        that's a little early
        • A 20-second pitch clock
        that's retarded;


        • The expansion of rosters to 26 men, with a 12-pitcher maximum
        agreed, at least 26 and a cap on how many pitchers;

        • Draft advantages for winning teams and penalties for losing teams
        that's retarded as well...sounds like the Yanks/Sox/Dodgers came up with this crap...however, teams that purposely sell off all their pieces to purposely tank should be penalized;

        • A study to lower the mound
        retarded;

        • A rule that would allow two-sport amateurs to sign major league contracts
        is that really necessary?

        Comment


        • #5
          https://www.baseballamerica.com/stor...H_y_n2bbC9WcuM

          From The Archives: Blame Ego Of Owners For No DH In NL



          The following Tracy Ringolsby column is reprinted from the November 1985 issue of Baseball America.


          KANSAS CITY, Mo.— Kenesaw Mountain Landis had the right idea in 1927. Then the commissioner of baseball, Landis proposed the designated hitter. At the time, the National League agreed, but the American League didn’t. And so the idea was dropped.

          Somewhere along the line the AL saw the error of its ways, and in 1973 decided to give the DH a try. The AL has found out it likes it.

          For some reason, however, the NL has reversed field and won’t let the DH assume its proper role in both major leagues. Won’t somebody wake up the NL?

          There is only one reason for the reluctance of NL owners—they won’t swallow their egos and admit the AL was right.

          Yes, letting the pitcher hit is a tradition, but what good is a tradition if it is detrimental to the welfare of the game?

          Face it, baseball has been a game of constant changes for the improvement. Just note the game’s equipment changes—from the stubby, little gloves to the mammoth, flexing pieces of leather today; from the thick-handled bottle-type bats to the shaved-down, cupped-end wands of today.

          Playing conditions have changed—from the 154-day-game schedule to today’s predominance of night games, from the cow-pasture-type playing fields to the smoothed-out surfaces of today (some real grass and some ersatz grass).

          And strategy changes—from a laid-back approach to the game to an aggressive approach, from the iron-man pitchers to the evolution of the bullpen stoppers.

          ***

          They laughed at Ned Hanlon in the 1890s when he conceived a style of baseball that included the hit-and-run, the squeeze and the double steal. It won pennants for the Orioles from 1894-96, but it was criticized by people who said it wasn’t baseball that Hanlon had his team playing.

          The same type of mentality has kept the DH out of the NL for the last 12 years.

          The statistics are well documented. The DH does produce more offense. Don’t waste your breath arguing that point. And the wear on pitchers’ arms has subsided since those first couple of years when the novelty of the DH led managers to stay with pitchers too long because the temptation to pinch-hit for them was gone.

          In the first two years of the DH, there was a modern-day high of AL pitchers who worked 250 innings or more—22 in 1973 and 23 in 1974. But by the end of the first decade of the DH, the number had dropped to five—three less than the NL.

          Now, if the NL and its fans would drop their simplistic arguments against the DH, baseball would be a better game.



          ***

          What the DH does is create more pressures for a manager. He has to know how to handle pitchers, and he can be more creative with the building of a lineup.

          In the late inning of an NL game, if a club is down a run and a man is on base, the manager pinch-hits for the pitcher. No questions asked.

          Or how about when an NL pitcher is struggling in the middle of an inning but is due to lead off when his team comes to bat? The manger leaves the pitcher in the game to make the pressure pitches that can ruin an arm. The manager has a built-in alibi. He was sparing the expense of using an extra pitcher by milking an extra out from someone who had lost his best stuff.

          An AL manager makes a pitching change because he feels it has to be made for the betterment of the game. It is made because the manager feels his pitcher has lost his best stuff. If the game blows up, the manager doesn’t have an excuse.

          "You have to have the ability as a manager to say, ‘This guy has had it,’ and make your move,” Twins manager Ray Miller said. "You have to have sound judgment of pitchers and what they are doing over the course of a game.”

          More than anything, however, the DH presents the manager with versatility in his batting order. By removing the pitcher, a manager can blend the strengths of a nine-man lineup.

          ***

          The DH requires more strategy during the course of a game than having a pitcher in the lineup. How bad is it for a manager to call for a sacrifice bunt when his pitcher comes to bat with a runner on first? It’s a defensive action during the offensive part of the game.

          The decisions a manager has to make are to pinch-hit, or not, and that normally is reserved for the late innings only.

          With the DH, offensive strategy is at work from the first inning on. What a pitcher-free lineup does is force a manager to consider all his options: swing away, sacrifice, steal or hit-and-run with the one through nine spots in his order.

          "It really starts with your No. 6 hitter,” Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog said. "If he gets on base, you hit-and-run with your seventh hitter. Say he grounds out and moves the runner to second. If you’ve got a pitcher in the lineup, they’ll pass your No. 8 hitter and go right to the pitcher.

          "With the DH, though, they’ve got to pitch to your hitters. It opens up a lot of things for you throughout your lineup.”

          ***

          What has to happen for the DH to reach its full potential is for AL team to realize it is a role for a complete offensive player, not an aging veteran. The true DH is a Don Baylor or Hal McRae, in his younger days—a fellow with defensive limitations, but one who has power, can drive in runs, hit for average and has better than average speed.

          That will come. Teams are making adjustments.

          But will the NL ever come around to logic in its approach to the DH? Will the NL ever realize the pettiness of its arguments based on "purist” grounds?

          It is so ironic for the NL to complain, when they believe in a league that has become a bastion of antiseptic ballparks with ersatz grass playing fields.

          "Most people who talk about the sacrilege of the DH are the NL owners whose teams play on artificial surfaces,” Miller said. "You talk about changing the game. I think any record that is set on artificial grass should have an asterisk next to it. Anyone who says the DH destroys the sanctity of the game, and plays on artificial grass is being sacrilegious himself—and a hypocrite.”

          Kenesaw Mountain Landis couldn’t have said it better.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by saxon View Post

            that's retarded;

            that's retarded as well...sounds like the Yanks/Sox/Dodgers came up with this crap...however, teams that purposely sell off all their pieces to purposely tank should be penalized;

            retarded;
            The clock is working in the minors

            Draft pick and other benefits received for tanking. They're trying figure out a way to stop teams from tanking in back-to-back seasons.

            As the pitchers get bigger and taller the mound needs to get lower so that the delivery of the pitch remains the same. It was reduce once before.

            There are other proposals I just heard on Baseball Night in NY
            • Banning the shift
            • September max game roster set to 28
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            • #7
              Found mo' propose changes . . . .
              • Reducing allowed mound visits from 6 to 3
              • Changing the 10-Day DL back to 15-Day
              • Moving the waiting period to recall a player from a Minor League option from 10 to 15 days
              • Rookies that receive Top 3 votes in ROY, CY and MVP are credited with a full season of service time whether they reached the minimum required total of days on roster
              • Revenue sharing being more closing tied to a team's record as a way to dissuade teams from tanking
              • MLBPA seems open to allowing players, dugouts, etc to be mic'ed up during games
              Drew's Sig

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              • #8
                MLB Proposes Three-Batter Minimum; MLBPA Proposes NL DH in 2019


                by BILL BAER
                5 Feb 5 2019, 10:24 PM EST

                Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association have sent proposals to each other focusing on ways to improve the game, Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports. MLB’s biggest suggestion would create a three-batter minimum for pitchers in an effort to reduce the amount of pitching changes made by managers, oftentimes grinding the game to a halt — particularly if it’s a mid-inning substitution.

                Among the union’s suggestions is a universal designated hitter beginning this year. According to Rosenthal, citing commissioner Rob Manfred, the union has been trying to get the DH in the National League for more than three decades. The American League adopted the DH rule in 1973.

                The union also suggested lowering a team’s draft position if it fails to reach a certain number of wins across multiple seasons. That would address the issue of tanking which has plagued baseball for close to a decade.

                Per Rosenthal, if the union and MLB don’t reach an agreement, Manfred still has the power to unilaterally implement three rules changes he proposed last year: a 20-second pitch clock, reducing mound visits from six to five, and placing a runner on second base to start extra innings beyond the 10th inning in spring training games and the All-Star Game. In the current proposal MLB sent to the MLBPA, the league seeks to reduce mound visits from six to four in 2019 and then down to three in 2020. The league also seeks, for the 2020 season, to expand to a 26-man roster while reducing expanded rosters in September from 40 to 28.

                These ideas are certainly interesting, to say the least. I’m not sure I buy any of them as they are presented. Implementing a universal DH rule with less than two months before the start of the regular season seems unfair to NL teams that don’t have the right roster construction and wouldn’t have enough time to properly address it. That being said, a universal DH would help boost offense, which has been lagging for most of this decade.

                Creating a three-batter minimum would reduce scenarios like the one Rosenthal mentions in his article — Brewers manager Craig Counsell using lefty Wade Miley for one batter before replacing him with right-hander Brandon Woodruff in Game 5 of the NLDS against the Dodgers — but it would limit managerial strategy, which is one of the aspects of baseball that, at least in this writer’s humble opinion, make it interesting. Perhaps a better alternative would be to create a discrete limit on the amount of pitchers a team can carry on its active roster. If we make that number, say, 12 on a 26-man roster, then teams still have the flexibility to make their pitching changes when they want to, but they would have to consider a faster depletion of resources.

                Speaking of the 26-man rosters: great idea. One more active roster spot creates at minimum 30 more major league jobs across the league, which is terrific in and of itself. The added space may make teams more willing to sign less-versatile players, as we’ve seen a dearth of interest in power-hitting first-base types in recent years in favor of more versatile, defensively-capable players.

                Shrinking the September rosters from 40 to 28 would hurt prospects and so-called “AAAA” players — players who aren’t quite good enough to make a regular 25-man roster, but are more than good enough to handle Triple-A competition. September call-ups accrue service time just like any other player and since there would be 360 fewer spots available, at least 360 players would have slower progress towards arbitration and free agency. On the other hand, September is a critical month of the season for obvious reasons, and it is often marred when teams that are dead in the water don’t try to win since they have the opportunity to give their younger, less experienced players major league at-bats and innings. Teams in the hunt for a playoff spot that just happened to get lucky and play fourth- and fifth-place teams in September get what are essentially free wins against these teams. Teams that aren’t so lucky may miss out on a playoff spot through no fault of their own.

                The best idea of the bunch is the penalty for teams failing to hit a certain win threshold over multiple seasons. It is unclear if the suggestion is that a team must hit at least X wins once in a span of Y years, or an aggregate total of Z wins over Y years. Either way, incentivizing teams to be at least somewhat competitive is a good thing. It will reduce teams shamelessly tanking and it very likely would also prevent teams from shamelessly manipulating the service time of their top prospects. Ah, who are we kidding? Teams are going to game players’ service time until there’s an explicit rule changing it.

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                • #9
                  2019 MLB Rule Change Proposals – What these changes could mean?

                  Three-batter Minimum
                  Let’s start at the top. A three-batter minimum for pitchers is an extreme change and could eliminate a bullpen job entirely, the one-out lefty-specialist. There are various reasons why the league has proposed this idea. Commissioner Rob Manfred is known for being concerned about the pace of play for Major League games, with the average game time longer than three hours.

                  By requiring a pitcher to face a minimum of three batters, fans will not have to watch the carousel of pitchers coming in during the late innings, warming up, going to TV break, and then facing one batter before the following pitcher comes in. Additionally, baseball is a sport that shows the least amount of late game score changes, because of the dominance of bullpens. According to ESPN’s Jeff Passan, the union did not strongly oppose the idea but asked for it to be tabled until the 2020 season, especially with spring training a week away.

                  Universal DH
                  A universal designated hitter is always discussed, especially when a nine-hole pitcher comes to the plate with two outs and runners in scoring positions. Consider for a moment the former Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher, Ivan Nova. In the past two years, Nova has gone 2-for-154. That is a batting average of .013. From a fan perspective, there’s nothing exciting about watching that.

                  This will also limit injuries to pitchers. They will not have to swing the bat, potentially foul the ball off their foot, run the bases, or get hit by a pitch. It will allow all pitchers to focus in on their craft while increasing entertainment from an offensive perspective with the DH. Starters could also go deeper into games because managers will no longer pull them early for strategic purposes when they are up to bat at a crucial time.

                  Expanded Rosters and Pitcher Changes
                  Additionally, with the idea that the rosters will be expanded to 26 players with a maximum of 12 pitchers, 30 jobs will be created. With nine starters and five guys on the bench, that provides for some very exciting pinch hitters and will add entertainment aspects to what is considered a boring sport by many casual fans.

                  The idea of a pitch clock is proposed every year. Despite negative feedback by the players, Manfred has the option to make this decision without the union’s approval, so it could be an inevitable change. He also is looking to potentially lower the mound.
                  Financial Proposals

                  Trade Deadline
                  Financially, there are three proposals; a single trade deadline, draft advantages for winning teams and penalties for losing teams, and a rule to allow two-sport amateurs to sign major league, rather than minor league, contracts. A single trade deadline, proposed by the Player’s Association, comes in a counter to how poor the free-agent market is. By forcing teams to look to improve before the half-way point, off-season acquisitions become that much more important.

                  This change forces MLB to be like the NFL which does not have big moves late in the season. Typically this helps a team that is close to 100 wins add players to push them over the edge. Rather, a player goes to a team that is getting hot before the second half of the season.

                  Draft Changes
                  Draft advantages for winning teams and penalties for losing teams is to prevent teams from tanking to get better players. This idea will help good players get to free agency and be picked up sooner by teams looking to improve. Also, the union suggested that teams that go below .500 for consecutive years could be negatively affected for the draft.

                  Kyler Murray Rule
                  The third proposal may as well be named the Kyler Murray rule. After being selected ninth overall in the 2018 MLB Draft by the Oakland Athletics, Murray returned to Oklahoma for his red-shirt junior season. What happened next was a Heisman-winning season for him, which brought up many questions about what sport he would choose. After constant negotiation with the Athletics, Murray declared for the NFL Draft. Ultimately, his professional destination remains undecided and likely hinges on the NFL Draft.

                  In situations like these, the MLB does not want to miss out on a potential game changing star. The union proposed that two-sport amateurs be offered major league contracts to entice these players to stick with baseball.

                  With spring training a week away, the likelihood of these rules coming into effect are not very high. However, they do raise the question: what will happen to this league going forward?

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                  • #10

                    Three-batter Minimum
                    I actually really like this idea. One of the worst parts of baseball now is getting through the 7th and 8th with 10 pitching changes. It's not baseball and it does kill the chances of late-inning scoring. It's become a situation where any run scored late is a failure of the bullpen and that's ridiculous. That of course is in addition to the obvious tiresome parade of manager trips to the mound and pitchers walking 300 feet and warming up. It's brutal.

                    Universal DH
                    Like most NL fans I'm against this but I see the tide starting to get momentum in the name of making the game "more interesting". That's the opposite of how I see it as now pitching changes have more at stake. I also don't see a distinct AL advantage. Yes they bring up Nova here but most pitchers aren't quite THAT bad, and they're accountable for actions on the mound. I can't imagine Don Drysdale or Bob Gibson advocating for the DH. Just having an additional power hitter up there isn't baseball.

                    Expanded Rosters and Pitcher Changes
                    Sure why not with the roster. I don't like the pitch clock because baseball isn't a timed game in general. What's next, an innings clock? Different pitchers have different styles and speed is part of that.

                    Trade Deadline
                    I'm not sure where I stand on this one but it's an interesting take. It would force teams to be more strategic about rosters earlier in the season including farm systems.

                    Draft Changes
                    Seriously? Will the big-market teams be happier if there's a period of 20 losing seasons again for good baseball towns like Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Detroit? This is stupid, small market teams are already at a huge disadvantage and can often become almost irrelevant. Half of the time they're just watching the time tick down until they lose their stars (if they have any) to big markets. Awful idea.

                    Kyler Murray Rule
                    This won't come up often but I see the point: you can play immediately for the NFL but usually not for baseball. Wouldn't it give teams reasons not to draft the two-way guys though? Giving up a major league roster spot is a big risk, especially given the track record of most of these players.

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                    • #11
                      Three-batter Minimum
                      I'm not 100% for the reliever 3 batter minimum rule. I'm also against the parade of relievers from the 7th inning on.

                      The way around it is to limit the number of relievers available. Like my suggestion to put SPs on a Reserve Squad to increase the bench strength, the reserve principle can be used for 9 innings by instituting an Extra Inning Squad. Relievers on the Extra Inning Squad can be used in extra inning games. The 9-inning max reliever limit should be 5. Like the batting order, the two reserve squads should be presented to the Home Plate Ump at the same the BO is presented to him.
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                      • #12
                        Reserve Squads
                        The bench has practically disappeared in today's baseball as the bullpen has grown ridiculously large in order to protect the arms of pitchers.

                        So my answer for arm protection is developing reserve squads for pitchers. Putting SPs on a Reserve Starting Pitcher Squad would remove 'em from the 25-man playing roster. And putting RPs on an Extra Inning Squad would at least limit the number of pitchers that can be used in a reliever parade.
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                        • #13
                          The Tanking Tax
                          Too many losing owners are raking in cash and not putting it back into the teams. Both the MLBPA & Commish Office are looking for ways to subject them to penalties for a string of losing seasons.
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                          • #14
                            • A three-batter minimum for pitchers
                              love it. Only exception to me would be if the if a pinch hitter is inserted, the opposing managers has a right to try to counter
                            • A universal designated hitter
                              don't like it, but accept it. Saw counter opinions above, but I am in the field that it's a huge disadvantage to the NL in AL parks, and a minor disadvantage to AL in NL parks. Equal rules, and as the DH isn't going away, might as well even the score.
                            • A single trade deadline before the All-Star break
                              Yes/No - make it for 8/15 or 8/31.
                            • A 20-second pitch clock
                              fine
                            • The expansion of rosters to 26 men, with a 12-pitcher maximum
                              I like Dru's reserve team idea. I'd create a reserve squad of 2 pitchers. Leave the total at 25 man squad + 2 on reserve. I wouldn't go too complicated with it though.
                            • Draft advantages for winning teams and penalties for losing teams
                              No. As a fan of a losing team that spends, are they going to have a worse draft pick than the sox too? The cost of losing is... losing. Create a payroll floor if you don't want teams tanking. Floor has to be on your active roster or DL. Can't trade away payroll if it drops you below the floor. If you want to tank while spending 75M and every penny of luxury tax money, be my guest.
                            • A study to lower the mound
                              ok
                            • A rule that would allow two-sport amateurs to sign major league contracts
                              Is there a rule that says they aren't allowed to be added to major league roster immediately? Or is that just tradition? Harper was in MLB by 2nd year
                            • Reducing allowed mound visits from 6 to 3
                              Too far, 6 feels right
                            • Changing the 10-Day DL back to 15-Day
                              I liked the 10 rule
                            • Moving the waiting period to recall a player from a Minor League option from 10 to 15 days
                              again, why? Is this such a need?
                            • Rookies that receive Top 3 votes in ROY, CY and MVP are credited with a full season of service time whether they reached the minimum required total of days on roster
                              no - make a consistent rule. If you want players up before X date to have a year, then make that date. If you want to stop the games, anyone up before sept call ups is given a full year. If not, just let it be.
                            • Revenue sharing being more closing tied to a team's record as a way to dissuade teams from tanking
                              addressed above. Spending floor
                            • MLBPA seems open to allowing players, dugouts, etc to be mic'ed up during games
                              Be prepared for a lot more cursing getting accidentally caught. And don't get all up in arms when it does. You invite yourself into a persons's home - don't be offended when you see a mess.

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                            • #15
                              https://twitter.com/TheAthleticMLB/status/
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