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2019 Bullpen - What Ain't Bad About This BP?

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  • 2019 Bullpen - What Ain't Bad About This BP?

    https://twitter.com/SNYtv/status/
    Drew's Sig

  • #2
    If none of the young guys show significant stuff in spring training, then yes that very well could be the bullpen.

    Comment


    • #3
      From MLBTR - "Checking In On The Worst Bullpens of 2018" - here is the entry regarding the Mets

      Mets (minus-0.6 fWAR; projected season-opening bullpen): Unlike the Royals and Marlins, the Mets are making a real effort to win in 2019. As a result, the bullpen has been a key area of focus for new Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen, who has swung a blockbuster trade to reel in arguably the best closer in baseball (ex-Mariner Edwin Diaz) and spent a combined $40MM on free agents Jeurys Familia and Justin Wilson this winter. Diaz, Familia and Wilson will join Seth Lugo, who was outstanding in 2018, and Robert Gsellman to give the Mets no fewer than five capable relievers.

      Perhaps the Mets will also benefit from less heralded pickups in Luis Avilan and Arquimedes Caminero, whom they signed to minors deals, and Rule 5 pick Kyle Dowdy. Regardless, New York’s new cast of relievers looks a whole lot better than last year’s bullpen, which relied too much on the likes of Paul Sewald, Jerry Blevins, Jacob Rhame, Tim Peterson and Anthony Swarzak, among other ineffective options, en route to a 4.96 ERA. Sewald, Rhame and Peterson are still in the organization, albeit as depth pieces, while Blevins and Swarzak are now gone. All things considered, ZIPS expects the Mets’ revamped bullpen to end up as one of the majors’ best in 2019.
      https://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2019/...s-of-2018.html

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      • saxon
        saxon commented
        Editing a comment
        IMO, the bullpen appears pretty decent...at least until injuries, but you can't predict that

    • #4
      Checking In On The Worst Bullpens Of 2018


      by CONNOR BYRNE
      3 Feb 2019 at 12:46 PM CDT

      The importance of having a dominant bullpen was on display in 2018, when four of the majors’ five best relief units in terms of fWAR helped pitch their teams to the postseason. On the other hand, four of the league’s five worst relief corps (and nine of the game’s bottom 10) watched the playoffs from home. So now, with the spring fast approaching, where do last year’s bottom-feeding bullpens stand? As you’ll see below, at least one has made major improvements this winter, but the rest look iffier. While there’s still time for these teams to add help from a free-agent class that remains awash with veterans, this quintet’s bullpen-related heavy lifting may be all but complete for the offseason.

      Mets (minus-0.6 fWAR; projected season-opening bullpen): Unlike the Royals and Marlins, the Mets are making a real effort to win in 2019. As a result, the bullpen has been a key area of focus for new Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen, who has swung a blockbuster trade to reel in arguably the best closer in baseball (ex-Mariner Edwin Diaz) and spent a combined $40MM on free agents Jeurys Familia and Justin Wilson this winter. Diaz, Familia and Wilson will join Seth Lugo, who was outstanding in 2018, and Robert Gsellman to give the Mets no fewer than five capable relievers.

      Perhaps the Mets will also benefit from less heralded pickups in Luis Avilan and Arquimedes Caminero, whom they signed to minors deals, and Rule 5 pick Kyle Dowdy. Regardless, New York’s new cast of relievers looks a whole lot better than last year’s bullpen, which relied too much on the likes of Paul Sewald, Jerry Blevins, Jacob Rhame, Tim Peterson and Anthony Swarzak, among other ineffective options, en route to a 4.96 ERA. Sewald, Rhame and Peterson are still in the organization, albeit as depth pieces, while Blevins and Swarzak are now gone. All things considered, ZIPS expects the Mets’ revamped bullpen to end up as one of the majors’ best in 2019.

      Drew's Sig

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      • #5
        Is This BP Better Then '18?

        Does a bear crap in the woods?

        Comment


        • saxon
          saxon commented
          Editing a comment
          only if someone's there to step in it

      • #6
        Lugo, Gsellman, Wilson, Familia, Diaz .Strong 5, and you would think one of those young arms from last year will take a step forward as well. I think the Mets bullpen will be at least top 10 in the league if guys stay healthy .

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        • #7
          Bullpens are notoriously hard to predict year over year, but this one gets significantly better just by adding Diaz. No one is a sure thing but he's about as close as you can get in terms of a young arm who had elite statistics across the board last year. Then when you bring back Familia as a setup man with a very different arsenal of pitches it's looking pretty good.

          Finally if they can add a fifth starter and move Vargas to long relief, it becomes MUCH more reliable overall. There's a lot of depth here and and array of good arms and styles.

          Last year we knew there would be issues (though the disaster of Blevins in particular was a surprise) but never expected it would be that awful. They've made an effort to really address the needs.

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          • #8
            and move Vargas to long relief
            Could happen and might even work, but Vargas hasn't pitched out of the pen since he became a rotation regular in 2009 and for his career only 41 of his 1490 IP were in relief. And with an ERA of 5.99 it was a relief to get him out of the pen.

            Vargas had a very poor start to last season, starting the season on the DL and then returning to the DL after 7 weeks-9 GS-38 IP and an ERA of 8.60.

            After 5 weeks he returned to the rotation at the end of July and made 11 starts, excluding one total disaster 0.1 IP and 3 ER he pitched to a 3.39 ERA, 3+:1 K:BB ratio and less than 1 HR/9. If that is what we can get from the 5th man, most would take it and run.

            I would think that long relief would be in the capable hands of Gsellman and Lugo

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            • #9
              It really is amazing how the first half of the season is so entrenched in fans' minds that the second half is somehow lost. I'm OK with Vargas as the #5 but it doesn't seem that the team is with the latest Gonzalez/Keuchel talk. It could be a smokescreen but this team does need a little more depth on the pitching staff.

              When were those 41 IP in relief? Early in his career or recently?

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              • #10
                https://twitter.com/AnthonyDiComo/status/
                Drew's Sig

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                • #11
                  Mets Confident in Diaz ... How About Rest of 'Pen?

                  Rare misstep for closer results in go-ahead homer in ninth inning


                  by ANTHONY DiCOMO
                  30 Apr 2019, 12:27 AM EDT

                  NEW YORK -- In setting forth an agenda to improve the Mets this winter, general manager Brodie Van Wagenen identified four distinct areas he wanted to address. His work in three of those -- lineup balance, run production and bench depth -- has borne early fruit, with many of the Mets’ bats thriving.

                  The fourth area, the bullpen, has not been so rosy. Entering Monday, Mets relievers ranked 28th in the Majors with a 5.52 ERA and 27th with an .823 opponents’ OPS. The culprits have been everywhere -- even closer Edwin Díaz, who made a rare mistake Monday in serving up a go-ahead ninth-inning homer to Jesse Winker in the Mets’ 5-4 loss to the Reds at Citi Field.

                  Manager Mickey Callaway says he’s not worried, mostly because when the Mets give their relievers leads, they convert. Indeed, the Mets have recorded nine saves and 14 holds against three blown saves, a roughly league-average rate in a small sample size. Callaway’s gripe is centered more on relief struggles in games the Mets are already losing.

                  Perhaps Diaz put it best when he said Monday that there are a lot of highs and lows with the bullpen so far.

                  https://twitter.com/AnthonyDiComo/status/


                  But we are working really hard, Diaz added through an interpreter. Today, I actually thought we did a good job, but we have to keep getting better every day.

                  Here’s a look at how Diaz and the Mets’ four other highest-leverage relievers have fared so far this season:

                  Edwin Diaz: 13 G, 11 2/3 IP, 8 SV, 2 BB, 20 K, 1.54 ERA
                  Winker’s home run aside, Diaz has been routinely excellent this season. He’s averaging 97 mph on his four-seamer and has fanned 45 percent of the batters he’s faced, while his 15.43 strikeouts per nine innings ranks sixth in the Majors (among pitchers with at least 10 innings). Before Monday’s game, Callaway referred to Diaz as advertised, which seems as apt a description as any.

                  I’m ready for the highs and lows of the game, Diaz said. I pitched well, but I was ready to take this loss because I don’t think I’m going to have many more this season.

                  Jeurys Familia: 13 G, 12 2/3 IP, 12 BB, 12 K, 5.68 ERA
                  Far more concerning on Monday was what happened during a scoreless eighth. Entering in a tie game, Jeurys Familia walked the leadoff man, hit the next batter and then, after a sacrifice bunt, intentionally walked another Reds hitter to load the bases. Next up was Jose Peraza, who pulled a 94-mph grounder to third, allowing Familia to descend the knife’s edge via a 5-3 double play.

                  When asked about Familia, Callaway mostly chalks up the setup man’s struggles to luck. But Familia’s batting average on balls in play is in line with his career norms, and luck doesn’t explain the walks -- 8.53 per nine innings, fourth most among Major League pitchers with at least 10 innings.

                  In particular, Familia has struggled to throw his signature sinker for strikes. He’s using that pitch less than ever, instead relying heavily on his split-fingered fastball -- a weapon he developed in 2014, then mostly abandoned before picking it back up again when the Mets traded him to the A’s last July. Which pitch mix is best? The Mets, who committed three years and $30 million to Familia, hope he finds the answers soon.

                  Seth Lugo: 13 G, 17.2 IP, 5 BB, 24 K, 4.08 ERA
                  Don’t be fooled by the relatively high ERA: Seth Lugo has been this bullpen’s savior. Most of the damage against him came early this season, when he was battling illness. Since April 7, Lugo has thrown 14 innings with a 1.93 ERA, 19 strikeouts and two walks. As usual, he and Houston’s Ryan Pressly lead their respective leagues in curveball spin rate.

                  Given all that, and given the fact that Lugo is a true fireman capable of pitching multiple innings at any time, the Mets would be in far more dire straits without him.

                  Justin Wilson: 9 G, 8.1 IP, 4 BB, 8 K, 3.24 ERA
                  Currently on the injured list due to left elbow soreness, Justin Wilson was inconsistent before suffering his injury. When he returns (perhaps as soon as this week), the Mets believe he’ll be just fine. In addition to throwing regularly in the mid-90s, Wilson ranks among the top six percent of Major League pitchers in terms of avoiding hard contact. The average exit velocity against him is 83.3 mph, also better than approximately 94 percent of the league.

                  Robert Gsellman: 13 G, 17 IP, 4 BB, 17 K, 4.24 ERA
                  What exactly is Robert Gsellman? Once a promising starter, Gsellman seemed to be developing into a dominant bullpen weapon as recently as last June. But he allowed three runs in a game on June 20, and he has posted a 5.40 ERA since that time.

                  Gsellman’s underlying statistics -- including his strikeout and walk rates, whiff rates and exit velocities -- indicate that more than anyone else on this list, he’s probably been the victim of some below-average luck. Still, the Mets won’t have infinite patience with Gsellman, whom they can option to the Minors if he remains inconsistent.

                  Drew's Sig

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                  • #12
                    Gagnon sure came up huge last night. He's had a rocky start but maybe he's upping his game as it gets into May. Also last night was NOT a Familia problem, it was a Callaway problem. To run Diaz out there for a third day in a row in a tie game no less? Familia was masterful for 5 batters and then gave out around pitch 27 and was kept in way too long after that. 8th inning guys train to go out there for an inning. You can stretch that a little but once they show fatigue it's time to pull them.

                    I have complete faith in Diaz (of course), Lugo and Gsellman (still). Gagnon could be a find and Zamora has some promise. Wilson would be a big addition if he could stay healthy, and I still believe in Familia but only with a prepared backup plan when his pitches go flat.

                    It's a better bullpen than last year because last year was historically awful. Diaz might be the best reliever in the NL and the parts of the bridge are there. They could use one more reliable guy though.

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                    • #13
                      I'll add its also a starters problem. The mets are near (if not at) the bottom of the league in IP by starting pitchers. That's going to tax your BP and lead to bad results (both from overexposure and tiredness).

                      I have faith in this BP once you stop asking them to pitch 4-5 innings every day

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                      • #14
                        I really don't like judging pitchers on their April performances. As cold fingers don't get a good feel of the ball.
                        Drew's Sig

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                        • #15
                          Also last night was NOT a Familia problem, it was a Callaway problem. To run Diaz out there for a third day in a row in a tie game no less? Familia was masterful for 5 batters and then gave out around pitch 27 and was kept in way too long after that. 8th inning guys train to go out there for an inning. You can stretch that a little but once they show fatigue it's time to pull them.

                          Thomasam, Diaz's work load suggests that Callaway was faultless in using Diaz for B-B-B appearances. Last season Diaz was called upon to pitch B-B-B 5 times;

                          .............................B-B PC........B-3 line

                          4/24 - 26.................31..............1.0, 1 BB, 1 K, 19 PC
                          5/1 - 3.....................37..............1.0, 1 H, 1 K, 16 PC
                          6/1 - 3.....................39..............1.0, 2 K, 17 PC
                          6/10 - 12.................21..............1.0, 2 K 11 PC
                          6/25 - 27.................22..............1.0, 2 K, 13 PC

                          Diaz also pitched on 4 consecutive days 8/9 - 12 with a combined 36 PC for the first 3, the 4th was 1.0, 1 H, 2 K, 10 PC.

                          Yesterday entered that game with a 22 PC over the 2 prior days, maybe credit is due Winkler who jumped on the first pitch (9th) and hit it out. Diaz needed 2 more pitches to dispatch Puig and end the inning.

                          Familia was pitching for a second day with 11 PC the day prior. He worked through the 8th inning with 7 pitches, he then needed 8 pitches to strike out the first two Reds. Todd Zeile on the post game believed that Familia 'lost focus' in walking Winkler on 4 pitches.

                          Was Zampora ready? Why would he be with Familia looking solid. This was the 6th time that Familia gave up run(s), only one of the 5 prior occurred on a second day pitching.

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