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Andrés Giménez - How Good Is He?

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  • #16
    Did everyone realize that Rojas was Gimenez's manager when Gimenez started to learn 2nd and 3rd?

    https://www.newsday.com/sports/baseb...rio-1.49102209

    Andres Gimenez impresses Mets with his defensive prowess


    After four straight days starting at shortstop — and making some spectacular plays in the process — Gimenez was subbed out for Rosario at shortstop Tuesday, but still got the start, this time at second base. He also earned some unreserved praise from Luis Rojas, who said that while he doesn’t consider shortstop a true platoon, he’ll continue to put out the best nine players every game. It just so happens that recently, that’s been Gimenez.

    “His ability is unbelievable out there,” Rojas said before the game against the Orioles. “He’s always on his toes. He’s thinking. He’s anticipating. That also gives him the chance to play second and third, like he has for us, at a plus level.”

    Gimenez made a number of sterling defensive plays at short on Monday, including one that Rojas was still marveling at on Tuesday — a throw from the third-base line on a shift to get a speedy Didi Gregorius at first.

    “Off the bat, I’ll tell you the truth, I had it as an infield single,” Rojas said. “The next thing you know, the ball’s at first and he got him by a foot or so. This kid is anticipating. He’s always on his toes. It’s almost like he’s moving before the ball is put in play.”

    All told, Gimenez has two defensive runs saved, compared to Rosario’s -4, along with a .293 average and a robust 0.7 WAR after only 34 games. His versatility — he can also play second and third, though he only picked up the positions two years ago — has given him added value as Rojas tries to puzzle out a lineup that will get the Mets into the playoffs with only 18 games to play (they’re in a somewhat dire position, despite the expanded postseason, and came into Tuesday two games out of a wild-card spot). Including Tuesday, Gimenez has played 13 games at second, and started four, and played in nine games at third.

    Rojas, who was Gimenez’s manager in Binghamton in 2018, said that when they introduced the new positions, they wanted him to have more versatility in preparation for the Fall League. They seemed to have gotten even more than they expected.

    “It was like nothing for him,” Rojas said. “It was really easy to work with him because of his footwork, IQ, everything . . . He’s really coachable. So, working with him, we figured that out, and he adapted to third. We were very comfortable putting him at any of those three positions knowing he was going to make the play.”

    Gimenez, for his part, said he’s constantly trying to anticipate a situation. That extends to his preparation at the two bases, too.

    “I always work at all the other bases in the infield,” he said through an interpreter. “I’ve gotten more comfortable as I’ve played more games there, but now, at this point, I feel comfortable at all bases.”

    All this means that, even in this short span, Gimenez has inserted himself in the NL Rookie of the Year conversation. None of that has seemed to faze him, nor does he betray any awe at how quickly he’s been able to adjust during a season that’s had even veterans trying to get their bearings.

    Going into Tuesday, Gimenez was hitting 9-for-21, with seven runs, a double, a home run, a walk, six RBIs and a steal in his last seven games with a plate appearance.

    “I think I’ve progressed in all facets of the game,” he said. “Physically, I have [progressed] obviously, but also my skills have [gotten] more refined throughout the years and I think that’s what’s helped me have success now.”

    And that has made him indispensable, no matter where he plays.

    By Laura Albanese laura.albanese@newsday.com @AlbaneseLaura
    Laura Albanese is a general assignment sports reporter; she began at Newsday in 2007 as an intern.
    Last edited by saxon; 10-Sep-2020, 04:13 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Thomasam View Post
      The "Rosario, Cano and cash" trade is just too convenient. You're asking a team to pick up a huge contract and the middle infielder that you're deeming the least valuable of your young players. Any "puzzle piece" trade just never works and they'd likely have to give up real value for an impact CF.
      No, I am NOT asking another team to pick up a huge contract. Thus the AND CASH part of the statement.

      Robinson has value now, but we would be better suited to use the other players in the spot he can play. Another team may be able to utilize him better than we could. I'm not saying sell low, I'm saying use assets to gain assets that fit us better by moving them to another team who has a potential need that WE could fill for them as well. A win-win type move.

      There may well not be a team that matches up, I'm only proposing a potential scenario that would be beneficial.

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      • #18
        Brian - do you consider Rosario an asset in the proposed trade scenario? He can play a good SS, but he doesn't walk, doesn't steal (and when he tried in 2019 he had 19 SB & 10 CS) and seems to be regressing with the bat. He's a #8 or #9 hitter.

        I get your point about Cano and cash, but you proposed that and Rosario for "an arm & CF". If I'm the other team, why would I do that?

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        • #19
          read an article today that talked about Rosarios skill set still be of interest to another team. Value might be at a low, but it is not gone.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by NY FANG View Post
            read an article today that talked about Rosarios skill set still be of interest to another team. Value might be at a low, but it is not gone.
            Agreed, but it isn't getting you a CF or a decent arm.

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            • #21
              but it will get you more than a JD Davis who hasn't stuck in the big leagues...

              If we're eating some of Cano making him a reasonable contract, and we're throwing in young controllable, high ceiling but low floor talent, then we might get one of those two things back... an unproven but highly regarded CF or same qualification pitcher...

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              • #22
                Originally posted by NY FANG View Post
                but it will get you more than a JD Davis who hasn't stuck in the big leagues...

                If we're eating some of Cano making him a reasonable contract, and we're throwing in young controllable, high ceiling but low floor talent, then we might get one of those two things back... an unproven but highly regarded CF or same qualification pitcher...
                If I were the one holding "an unproven but highly regarded CF or same qualification pitcher", no way do I make that trade for an aging Cano and a mediocre Rosario. Why wouldn't I hold onto the high regarded prospect myself in positions of scarcity? And if I am trading them, I sure as hell want a better return than you are offering. And am sure that another team will make that offer.

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                • #23
                  It all depends on the team.

                  Like I said, I have not really examined the potential players out there, but a contending, or close to contending, team that needs a good bat and can take a chance on a talented player who may just need a change of scenery?

                  I could see that scenario.

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