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Andrés Giménez - How Good Is He?

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  • Andrés Giménez - How Good Is He?

    Andres Gimenez Turning Heads After Surprisingly Making Mets


    by Mike Puma
    5 Aug 2020, 6:34 PM ET

    WASHINGTONAndres Gimenez was a surprise roster addition at the end of spring training 2.0, but suddenly has assumed a larger role with the Mets.
    Robinson Cano’s recent move to the injured list with a grade 2 abductor strain and ailments to Jeff McNeil and Amed Rosario that kept both removed from the starting lineup for the past two days elevated the rookie Gimenez to indispensable status as manager Luis Rojas struggled to fill out a lineup.

    Gimenez, who has also played third base and second base, received a second straight start at shortstop Wednesday as Rosario remained sidelined with quadriceps tightness.

    The Mets have long known about Gimenez’s smooth fielding, but his offense has been equally prevalent in the first two weeks of the season. He was 7-for-21 (.333) with two stolen bases entering Wednesday’s game against the Nationals.

    “He’s going to be a great player,” McNeil said. “His defense is incredibly smooth and he’s going to make every single play and he’s a good scrappy bat as well. He’s going to put the ball in play and he’s going to make a lot of things happen for this team.”

    The 21-year-old Gimenez struggled offensively last year at Double-A Binghamton, in part because he was adapting to a new leg-kick he implemented early in the season, but then won the batting title in the Arizona Fall League, where he hit .371 in 75 plate appearances.

    “I think last year was a year of adjustments for me and it led into the Arizona Fall League,” Gimenez said through an interpreter. “I also included a leg kick in my swing and I think that has helped me as well, but I continue to work every single day and it’s not just my hitting I work on. I try to work on my entire package.”

    Gimenez’s defense never has been a question, with his quick footwork and strong throwing arm. Gimenez’s speed is another asset. All were attributes Luis Rojas had seen managing Gimenez in 2018 at Binghamton, but the infielder’s offensive improvement has been the surprise.

    “I saw it in spring training, back in February and March, the difference in his stance, how he is more upright,” Rojas said. “He is more on top of the ball and creating more leverage opposed to before when he used to be more squatted and kind of timing, balancing back and forth to get the bat out. Now it’s less effort to get the at out. He’s a little bit stronger and that causes him to have more recognition of pitches and create more power.

    “He is doing different things, spraying the ball. He used to be like a slap hitter, now he is this guy that if you make a mistake with him he can do some real damage, so great job by him with the muscle part getting stronger and also working on the hitting mechanics to become the hitter he is right now.”


    If the Mets are fortunate enough to get their three infielders back, Gimenez’s role could largely be to assume a super-utility role, although Cano could move into a DH situation that would open up second base.

    If the Mets have a longer-term opening, it could give Gimenez the opportunity he needs to show he can play every day in 2021.

    “It feels good, putting in that work day by day to give my best and be available when the team needs me,” Gimenez said. “I think that is the most important thing for me.”


    Drew's Sig

  • #3
    one of the Mets broadcasters (Likely Gary) said something along the lines of: Infielder coach Gary Disarcina said that Gimenez reminds him of Omar Vizquel...

    Comment


    • #4
      The Vizquel comparison feels apt. Right away you can tell Gimenez has great baseball instincts, both in the field and on the basepaths. If he develops into a good gap hitter he could be absolute gold for this team for a decade. The Rosario trade talk will only grow among fans this year but he's too good to move and hopefully he can adjust to 2B or CF because Gimenez is just too natural at short.

      Comment


      • #5
        https://twitter.com/RisingAppleBlog/...46897538506752

        Drew's Sig

        Comment


        • #6
          https://twitter.com/SNYtv/status/1292856398536159233

          Drew's Sig

          Comment


          • #7
            Andres Gimenez Turning Heads After Surprisingly Making Mets


            by MIKE PUMA
            5 Aug 2020, 6:34 PM ET

            WASHINGTON — Andrés Giménez was a surprise roster addition at the end of spring training 2.0, but suddenly has assumed a larger role with the Mets.

            Robinson Cano’s recent move to the injured list with a grade 2 abductor strain and ailments to Jeff McNeil and Amed Rosario that kept both removed from the starting lineup for the past two days elevated the rookie Gimenez to indispensable status as manager Luis Rojas struggled to fill out a lineup.

            Gimenez, who has also played third base and second base, received a second straight start at shortstop Wednesday as Rosario remained sidelined with quadriceps tightness.

            The Mets have long known about Gimenez’s smooth fielding, but his offense has been equally prevalent in the first two weeks of the season. He was 7-for-21 (.333) with two stolen bases entering Wednesday’s game against the Nationals.

            “He’s going to be a great player,” McNeil said. “His defense is incredibly smooth and he’s going to make every single play and he’s a good scrappy bat as well. He’s going to put the ball in play and he’s going to make a lot of things happen for this team.”

            The 21-year-old Gimenez struggled offensively last year at Double-A Binghamton, in part because he was adapting to a new leg-kick he implemented early in the season, but then won the batting title in the Arizona Fall League, where he hit .371 in 75 plate appearances.

            “I think last year was a year of adjustments for me and it led into the Arizona Fall League,” Gimenez said through an interpreter. “I also included a leg kick in my swing and I think that has helped me as well, but I continue to work every single day and it’s not just my hitting I work on. I try to work on my entire package.”

            Gimenez’s defense never has been a question, with his quick footwork and strong throwing arm. Gimenez’s speed is another asset. All were attributes Luis Rojas had seen managing Gimenez in 2018 at Binghamton, but the infielder’s offensive improvement has been the surprise.

            “I saw it in spring training, back in February and March, the difference in his stance, how he is more upright,” Rojas said. “He is more on top of the ball and creating more leverage opposed to before when he used to be more squatted and kind of timing, balancing back and forth to get the bat out. Now it’s less effort to get the at out. He’s a little bit stronger and that causes him to have more recognition of pitches and create more power.

            “He is doing different things, spraying the ball. He used to be like a slap hitter, now he is this guy that if you make a mistake with him he can do some real damage, so great job by him with the muscle part getting stronger and also working on the hitting mechanics to become the hitter he is right now.”


            If the Mets are fortunate enough to get their three infielders back, Gimenez’s role could largely be to assume a super-utility role, although Cano could move into a DH situation that would open up second base.

            If the Mets have a longer-term opening, it could give Gimenez the opportunity he needs to show he can play every day in 2021.

            “It feels good, putting in that work day by day to give my best and be available when the team needs me,” Gimenez said. “I think that is the most important thing for me.”

            Drew's Sig

            Comment


            • #9
              It's only 40 games or so, but Amed better start looking hard over his shoulder.

              Every time I think that Andres might be coming down to Earth a bit, he turns it back on, and that glove plays anywhere it is put.

              Comment


              • #10
                That glove is the there, he can play D anywhere he is put.

                The bat is the key. If what he has done so far is legit, Rosario better learn center or have Brody's moving company on speed dial.

                Especially with Mauricio lurking out there, too. Guillorme becomes an impressive glove on the bench, and with his bat progression, that is a bonus.

                Maybe trade Rosario, Cano, and money for an arm and CF?

                Comment


                • #11
                  Best case scenario to me would be:

                  Make the trade noted above.

                  Sign Realmuto and Bauer (or maybe Ray) and resign Stroman and lock up Conforto.

                  1B Smith
                  2B McNeil
                  3B Davis
                  SS Gimenez
                  LF Nimmo
                  CF trade acquisition
                  RF Conforto
                  C Realmuto
                  DH Alonso

                  B Marisnik
                  B Guillorme
                  B Nido

                  SP DeGrom
                  SP Bauer/Ray
                  SP Stroman
                  SP Peterson
                  SP Syndergaard

                  RP Lugo
                  RP Gsellman
                  RP Shreve
                  RP Brach
                  RP Castro
                  RP Wilson

                  Closer TBD

                  One open spot left TBD.

                  Thoughts?

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Cano has hugely surprised me with his resurgence this year. I had written him off as a money pit. But he is hitting for both average and power, up among the team leaders in both. And he still plays an acceptable 2B (Jeff Kent?). We have Guillorme off the bench as a defensive replacement.

                    Whether I like it or not, it appears that the DH is here to stay. There is more than enough playing time to go around. I'm not so sure I am looking to trade Cano anymore.

                    And if you don't think that Cano is going to keep a decent level of production going, how do you expect to trade him, a punch-less Rosario and cash for a CF & an arm, two of the most important positions on the diamond?

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      https://twitter.com/TheRecordSports/...61888265723905

                      Drew's Sig

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        https://twitter.com/mikemayerMMO/sta...71162712240129

                        Drew's Sig

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          The "Rosario, Cano and cash" trade is just too convenient. You're asking a team to pick up a huge contract and the middle infielder that you're deeming the least valuable of your young players. Any "puzzle piece" trade just never works and they'd likely have to give up real value for an impact CF.

                          Comment


                          • saxon
                            saxon commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Cano is untradeable, Rosario's stock is at an alltime low...you might be able to get a mediocre bullpen arm in that proposal...the only real tradeable pieces right now involve one of our 12 1B/LFers: Dom, McNeil, Nimrod, Conforto, JD, Alonso....even as good as Guillmorme has been this season, he's still got no trade value
                            Last edited by saxon; 10-Sep-2020, 11:01 AM.
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